Youth: Its Education, Regimen, and Hygiene

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Ngôn Ngữ Nội Dung Sách
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Năm xuất bản
2012
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     *** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK YOUTH, ITS EDUCATION, REGIMEN, HYGIENE ***
     Produced by Stan Goodman, Shawn Wheeler and Distributed Proofreaders
 YOUTH

 ITS EDUCATION, REGIMEN, AND HYGIENE

     BY
 G. STANLEY HALL, Ph.D., LL.D.
 President of Clark University and
 Professor of Psychology
 And Pedagogy
 
 PREFACE

     I have often been asked to select and epitomize the practical and especially the pedagogical conclusions of my large volumes on Adolescence, published in 1904, in such form that they may be available at a minimum cost to parents, teachers, reading circles, normal schools, and college classes, by whom even the larger volumes have been often used. This, with the coöperation of the publishers and with the valuable aid of Superintendent C.N. Kendall of Indianapolis, I have tried to do, following in the main the original text, with only such minor changes and additions as were necessary to bring the topics up to date, and adding a new chapter on moral and religions education. For the scientific justification of my educational conclusions I must, of course, refer to the larger volumes. The last chapter is not in "Adolescence," but is revised from a paper printed elsewhere. I am indebted to Dr. Theodore L. Smith of Clark University for verification of all references, proof-reading, and many minor changes.
 G. STANLEY HALL.

 CONTENTS

 I.—PRE-ADOLESCENCE

     Introduction: Characterization of the age from eight to twelve—The era of recapitulating the stages of primitive human development—Life close to nature—The age also for drill, habituation, memory work, and regermination—Adolescence superposed upon this stage of life, but very distinct from it
 II.—THE MUSCLES AND MOTOR POWERS IN GENERAL

     Muscles as organs of the will, of character, and even of thought—The muscular virtues—Fundamental and accessory muscles and functions—The development of the mind and of the upright position—Small muscles as organs of thought—School lays too much stress upon these—Chorea—Vast numbers of automatic movements in children—Great variety of spontaneous activities—Poise, control, and spurtiness—Pen and tongue wagging—Sedentary school life vs. free out-of-door activities—Modern decay of muscles, especially in girls—Plasticity of motor habits at puberty
 III.—INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION.

     Trade classes and schools, their importance in the international market—Our dangers and the superiority of German workmen—The effects of a tariff—Description of schools between the kindergarten and the industrial school—Equal salaries for teachers in France—Dangers from machinery—The advantages of life on the old New England farm—Its resemblance to the education we now give negroes and Indians—Its advantage for all-sided muscular development
 IV.—MANUAL TRAINING AND SLOYD.

     History of the movement—Its philosophy—The value of hand training in the development of the brain and its significance in the making of man—A grammar of our many industries hard—The best we do can reach but few—Very great defects in manual training methods which do not base on science and make nothing salable—The Leipzig system—Sloyd is hypermethodic—These crude peasant industries can never satisfy educational needs—The gospel of work; William Morris and the arts and crafts movement—Its spirit desirable—The magic effects of a brief period of intense work—The natural development of the drawing instinct in the child
 V.—GYMNASTICS
 

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