A General History for Colleges and High Schools

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Ngôn Ngữ Nội Dung Sách
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2004
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     *** START OF THE PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK A GENERAL HISTORY ***
     Produced by Anne Soulard, Charles Franks and the Online Distributed Proofreading Team.
 A GENERAL HISTORY FOR COLLEGES AND HIGH SCHOOLS.

 BY P. V. N. MYERS, A.M.

     [Illustration: VIEW OF THE ATTIC PLAINS, WITH A GLIMPSE OF THE ACROPOLIS OF ATHENS.—Frontispiece.] 
 PREFACE.

     This volume is based upon my Ancient History and Mediæval and Modern History. In some instances I have changed the perspective and the proportions of the narrative; but in the main, the book is constructed upon the same lines as those drawn for the earlier works. In dealing with so wide a range of facts, and tracing so many historic movements, I cannot hope that I have always avoided falling into error. I have, however, taken the greatest care to verify statements of fact, and to give the latest results of discovery and criticism.
     Considering the very general character of the present work, an enumeration of the books that have contributed facts to my narration, or have helped to mould my views on this or that subject, would hardly be looked for; yet I wish here to acknowledge my special indebtedness, in the earlier parts of the history, to the works of George Rawlinson, Sayce, Wilkinson, Brugsch, Grote, Curtius, Mommsen, Merivale, and Leighton; and in the later parts, and on special periods, to the writings of Hodgkin, Emerton, Ranke, Freeman, Michaud, Bryce, Symonds, Green (J. R.), Motley, Hallam, Thiers, Lecky, Baird, and Müller.
     Several of the colored maps, with which the book will be found liberally provided, were engraved especially for my Ancient History; but the larger number are authorized reproductions of charts accompanying Professor Freeman's Historical Geography of Europe. The Roman maps were prepared for Professor William F. Allen's History of Rome, which is to be issued soon, and it is to his courtesy that I am indebted for their use.
     The illustrations have been carefully selected with reference to their authenticity and historical truthfulness. Many of those in the Oriental and Greek part of the work are taken from Oscar Jäger's Weltgeschichte; while most of those in the Roman portion are from Professor Allen's forthcoming work on Rome, to which I have just referred, the author having most generously granted me the privilege of using them in my work, notwithstanding it is to appear in advance of his.
     Further acknowledgments of indebtedness are also due from me to many friends who have aided me with their scholarly suggestions and criticism. My warmest thanks are particularly due to Professor W.F. Allen, of the University of Wisconsin; to Dr. E.W. Coy, Principal of Hughes High School, Cincinnati; to Professor William A. Merrill, of Miami University; and to Mr. D. H. Montgomery, author of The Leading Facts of History series. 
     P. V. N. M. COLLEGE HILL, OHIO, July, 1889. 
 TABLE OF CONTENTS.

 PREFACE LIST OF MAPS GENERAL INTRODUCTION: THE RACES AND THEIR EARLY MIGRATIONS

 PART I.

 ANCIENT HISTORY.

 SECTION I.—THE EASTERN NATIONS.

 CHAPTER I. India and China. 1. India. 2. China. II. Egypt. 1. Political History. 2. Religion, Arts, and General Culture. III. Chaldæa. 1. Political History. 2. Arts and General Culture. IV. Assyria. 1. Political History. 2. Religion, Arts, and General Culture. V. Babylonia. VI. The Hebrews. VII. The Phoenicians. VIII. The Persian Empire. 1. Political History. 2. Government, Religion, and Arts.

 SECTION II.—GRECIAN HISTORY.

          IX. The Land and the People.       X. The Legendary or Heroic Age.      XI. Religion of the Greeks.     XII. Age of the Tyrants and of Colonization: the Early Growth of          Sparta and of Athens.          1. Age of the Tyrants and of Colonization.          2. The Growth of Sparta.          3. The Growth of Athens.    XIII. The Græco-Persian Wars.     XIV. Period of Athenian Supremacy.      XV. The Peloponnesian War: the Spartan and the Theban Supremacy.          1. The Peloponnesian War.          2. The Spartan and the Theban Supremacy.     XVI. Period of Macedonian Supremacy: Empire of Alexander.    XVII. States formed from the Empire of Alexander.   XVIII. Greek Architecture, Sculpture, and Painting.          1. Architecture.          2. Sculpture and Painting.     XIX. Greek Literature.          1. Epic and Lyric Poetry.          2. The Drama and Dramatists.          3. History and Historians.          4. Oratory.      XX. Greek Philosophy and Science.     XXI. Social Life of the Greeks. 
 SECTION III.—ROMAN HISTORY.

        XXII. The Roman Kingdom.   XXIII. The Early Roman Republic: Conquest of Italy.    XXIV. The First Punic War.     XXV. The Second Punic War.    XXVI. The Third Punic War.   XXVII. The Last Century of the Roman Republic.  XXVIII. The Last Century of the Roman Republic (concluded).    XXIX. The Roman Empire (from 31 B.C. to A.D. 180).     XXX. Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire in the West (A.D. 180-476).    XXXI. Roman Civilization.          1. Architecture.          2. Literature, Philosophy, and Law.          3. Social Life. 
 PART II.

 MEDIÆVAL AND MODERN HISTORY.

 INTRODUCTION.

 SECTION I.—MEDIÆVAL HISTORY.

     FIRST PERIOD.—THE DARK AGES. (From the Fall of Rome, A.D. 476, to the Eleventh Century.) 
       XXXII. Migrations and Settlements of the Teutonic Tribes.  XXXIII. The Conversion of the Barbarians.   XXXIV. Fusion of the Latin and Teutonic Peoples.    XXXV. The Roman Empire in the East.   XXXVI. Mohammed and the Saracens.  XXXVII. Charlemagne and the Restoration of the Empire in the West. XXXVIII. The Northmen.   XXXIX. Rise of the Papal Power. 
     SECOND PERIOD.—THE AGE OF REVIVAL. (From the opening of the Eleventh Century to the Discovery of America by Columbus, in 1492.) 
          XL. Feudalism and Chivalry.          1. Feudalism.          2. Chivalry.     XLI. The Norman Conquest of England.    XLII. The Crusades.          1. Introductory: Causes of the Crusades.          2. The First Crusade.          3. The Second Crusade.          4. The Third Crusade.          5. The Fourth Crusade.          6. Close of the Crusades: Their Results.   XLIII. Supremacy of the Papacy: Decline of its Temporal Power.    XLIV. Conquests of the Turanian Tribes.     XLV. Growth of the Towns: The Italian City-Republics.    XLVI. The Revival of Learning.   XLVII. Growth of the Nations: Formation of National Governments          and Literatures.          1. England.          2. France.          3. Spain.          4. Germany.          5. Russia.          6. Italy.          7. The Northern Countries. 
 SECTION II. MODERN HISTORY.

 INTRODUCTION

     THIRD PERIOD.—THE ERA OF THE PROTESTANT REFORMATION. (From the Discovery of America to the Peace of Westphalia, in 1648.) 
      XLVIII. The Beginnings of the Reformation under Luther.    XLIX. The Ascendency of Spain.          1. Reign of the Emperor Charles V.          2. Spain under Philip II.       L. The Tudors and the English Reformation.          1. Introductory.          2. The Reign of Henry VII.          3. England severed from the Papacy by Henry VIII.          4. Changes in the Creed and Ritual under Edward VI.          5. Reaction under Mary.          6. Final Establishment of Protestantism under Elizabeth.      LI. The Revolt of the Netherlands: Rise of the Dutch Republic.     LII. The Huguenot Wars in France.    LIII. The Thirty Years' War. 
     FOURTH PERIOD.—THE ERA OF THE POLITICAL REVOLUTION. (From the Peace of Westphalia, in 1648, to the present time.) 
         LIV. The Ascendency of France under the Absolute Government of          Louis XIV.      LV. England under the Stuarts: The English Revolution.          1. The First Two Stuarts.          2. The Commonwealth.          3. The Restored Stuarts.          4. The Orange-Stuarts.          5. England under the Earlier Hanoverians.     LVI. The Rise of Russia: Peter the Great.    LVII. The Rise of Prussia: Frederick the Great.   LVIII. The French Revolution.          1. Causes of the Revolution: The States-General of 1789.          2. The National, or Constituent Assembly.          3. The Legislative Assembly.          4. The National Convention.          5. The Directory.     LIX. The Consulate and the First Empire: France since the Second          Restoration.          1. The Consulate and the Empire.          2. France since the Second Restoration.      LX. Russia since the Congress of Vienna.     LXI. German Freedom and Unity.    LXII. Liberation and Unification of Italy.   LXIII. England since the Congress of Vienna.          1. Progress towards Democracy.          2. Expansion of the Principle of Religious Equality.          3. Growth of the British Empire in the East. 
 CONCLUSION: THE NEW AGE. INDEX, PRONOUNCING VOCABULARY, AND GLOSSARY

 LIST OF COLORED MAPS.

     1. Ancient Egypt 2. The Tigris and the Euphrates 3. Lydia, Media, and Babylonia, c. B.C. 550 4. Greece and the Greek Colonies 5. Greece in the 5th Century B.C. 6. Dominions and Dependencies of Alexander, c. B.C. 323 7. Kingdoms of the Successors of Alexander, c. B.C. 300 8. Italy before the Growth of the Roman Power 9. Mediterranean Lands at the Beginning of Second Punic War 10. Roman Dominions at the End of the Mithridatic War, B.C. 64 11. The Roman Empire under Trajan, A.D. 117 12. Roman Empire divided into Prefectures 13. Europe in the Reign of Theodoric, c. A.D. 500 14. Europe in the Time of Charles the Great, 814 15. The Western Empire as divided at Verdun, 843 16. Spanish Kingdoms, 1360 17. Central Europe, 1360 18. The Spanish Kingdoms and their European Dependencies under Charles V 19. Europe in the 16th and 17th Centuries 20. The Baltic Lands, c. 1701 21. Central Europe, 1801 22. Sketch Map of Europe showing Principal Battles of Napoleon [Footnote: For the use of this map I am indebted to the courtesy of Mr. D. H. Montgomery, author of "Leading Facts of French History."] 23. Central Europe, 1810 24. Central Europe, 1815 25. South-Eastern Europe according to the Treaty of Berlin, 1878 26. Europe in 1880
 

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