The Loss of the SS. Titanic

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Ngôn Ngữ Nội Dung Sách
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Năm xuất bản
2004
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*** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK THE LOSS OF THE SS. TITANIC ***

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Distributed Proofreading Team. This file was produced from
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THE LOSS OF THE S. S. TITANIC

     ITS STORY AND ITS LESSONS

     BY

     LAWRENCE BEESLEY

     B. A. (Cantab.)

     Scholar of Gonville and Caius College

     ONE OF THE SURVIVORS

     

 PREFACE

     The circumstances in which this book came to be written are as follows. Some five weeks after the survivors from the Titanic landed in New York, I was the guest at luncheon of Hon. Samuel J. Elder and Hon. Charles T. Gallagher, both well-known lawyers in Boston. After luncheon I was asked to relate to those present the experiences of the survivors in leaving the Titanic and reaching the Carpathia.
     When I had done so, Mr. Robert Lincoln O'Brien, the editor of the Boston Herald, urged me as a matter of public interest to write a correct history of the Titanic disaster, his reason being that he knew several publications were in preparation by people who had not been present at the disaster, but from newspaper accounts were piecing together a description of it. He said that these publications would probably be erroneous, full of highly coloured details, and generally calculated to disturb public thought on the matter. He was supported in his request by all present, and under this general pressure I accompanied him to Messrs. Houghton Mifflin Company, where we discussed the question of publication.
     Messrs. Houghton Mifflin Company took at that time exactly the same view that I did, that it was probably not advisable to put on record the incidents connected with the Titanic's sinking: it seemed better to forget details as rapidly as possible.
     However, we decided to take a few days to think about it. At our next meeting we found ourselves in agreement again,—but this time on the common ground that it would probably be a wise thing to write a history of the Titanic disaster as correctly as possible. I was supported in this decision by the fact that a short account, which I wrote at intervals on board the Carpathia, in the hope that it would calm public opinion by stating the truth of what happened as nearly as I could recollect it, appeared in all the American, English, and Colonial papers and had exactly the effect it was intended to have. This encourages me to hope that the effect of this work will be the same.
     Another matter aided me in coming to a decision,—the duty that we, as survivors of the disaster, owe to those who went down with the ship, to see that the reforms so urgently needed are not allowed to be forgotten.
     Whoever reads the account of the cries that came to us afloat on the sea from those sinking in the ice-cold water must remember that they were addressed to him just as much as to those who heard them, and that the duty, of seeing that reforms are carried out devolves on every one who knows that such cries were heard in utter helplessness the night the Titanic sank.
     

     CONTENTS

     I. CONSTRUCTION AND PREPARATIONS FOR THE FIRST VOYAGE
 II. FROM SOUTHAMPTON TO THE NIGHT OF THE COLLISION
 III. THE COLLISION AND EMBARKATION IN LIFEBOATS
 IV. THE SINKING OF THE TITANIC, SEEN FROM A LIFEBOAT
 V. THE RESCUE
 VI. THE SINKING OF THE TITANIC, SEEN FROM HER DECK
 VII. THE CARPATHIA'S RETURN TO NEW YORK
 VIII. THE LESSONS TAUGHT BY THE LOSS OF THE TITANIC
 IX. SOME IMPRESSIONS
     

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