Stories of Later American History

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Ngôn Ngữ Nội Dung Sách
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2006
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     ***START OF THE PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK STORIES OF LATER AMERICAN HISTORY***
      
     E-text prepared by Barbara Tozier, Bill Tozier, and the Project Gutenberg Online Distributed Proofreading Team (http://www.pgdp.net/)
      
      
 A man carries a rifle. He is on a broad plain, surrounded by wagons and people.     Pioneers on the Overland Route, Westward.
 
 STORIES OF LATER AMERICAN HISTORY

     BY

 WILBUR F. GORDY

     FORMERLY SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS, SPRINGFIELD, MASS.; AUTHOR OF “A HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES FOR SCHOOLS,” “ELEMENTARY HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES,” “AMERICAN LEADERS AND HEROES,” “AMERICAN BEGINNINGS IN EUROPE,” “STORIES OF AMERICAN EXPLORERS,” “COLONIAL DAYS,” AND “STORIES OF EARLY AMERICAN HISTORY”

     WITH MAPS AND ILLUSTRATIONS

     CHARLES SCRIBNER’S SONS
 NEW YORK    CHICAGO    BOSTON

     Copyright, 1915, by
 CHARLES SCRIBNER’S SONS

 PREFACE

     This book, like “Stories of Early American History,” follows somewhat closely the course of study prepared by the Committee of Eight, the present volume covering the topics outlined for Grade V, while the earlier one includes the material suggested for Grade IV.
     It was the plan of that committee to take up in these grades, largely in a biographical way, a great part of the essential facts of American history; and with this plan the author, who was a member of that committee, was in hearty accord. This method, it is believed, serves a double purpose. In the first place, it is the best possible way of laying the foundation for the later and more detailed study of United States history in the higher grammar grades by those pupils who are to continue in school; and in the second, it gives to that large number of pupils who will leave school before the end of the sixth grade—which is at least half of all the boys and girls in the schools of the country—some acquaintance with the leading men and prominent events of American history.
     It is without doubt a great mistake to allow half of the pupils to go out from our public schools with almost no knowledge of the moral and material forces which have made this nation what it is to-day. It is an injustice to the young people themselves; it is also an injury to their country, the vigor of whose life will depend much upon their intelligent and patriotic support.
     With this conviction, it has been the author’s desire to make the story of the events concrete, dramatic, and lifelike by centring them about leaders, heroes, and other representative men, in such a way as to appeal to the imagination and to influence the ideals of the child. In so doing, he has made no attempt to write organized history—tracing out its intricate relations of cause and effect. At the same time, however, he has aimed to select his facts and events so carefully that the spirit of our national life and institutions, as well as many of the typical events of American history, may be presented.
     It is confidently hoped that the fine illustrations and the attractive typographical features of the book will help to bring vividly before the mind of the child the events narrated in the text.
     Another aid in making the stories vivid will, it is intended, be found in “Some Things to Think About.” These and many similar questions, which the teacher can easily frame to fit the needs of her class, will help the pupil to make real the life of days gone by as well as to connect it with the present time and with his own life.
     In conclusion, I wish to acknowledge my deep obligations to Mr. Forrest Morgan, of the Watkinson Library, Hartford, and to Miss Elizabeth P. Peck, of the Hartford Public High School, both of whom have read the manuscript and have made many valuable criticisms and suggestions.
     Wilbur F. Gordy.

     Hartford, Conn.,
 April 15, 1915.
 CONTENTS

 CHAPTER

     Patrick Henry
     Samuel Adams
     The War Begins near Boston
     George Washington in the Revolution
     Nathanael Greene and Other Heroes in the South
     John Paul Jones
     Daniel Boone
     James Robertson
     John Sevier
     George Rogers Clark
     The New Republic
     Increasing the Size of the New Republic
     Internal Improvements
     The Republic Grows Larger
     Three Great Statesmen
     The Civil War
     Four Great Industries
     Index
 ILLUSTRATIONS

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