Algonquin Indian Tales

Tác giả
Chủ đề
Ngôn Ngữ Nội Dung Sách
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Năm xuất bản
2004
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            CHAPTER I.

 The Children Carried Off by the Indians—The Feast in the Wigwam—Souwanas, the Story-teller—Nanahboozhoo, the Indian Myth—How the Wolves Stole His Dinner, and Why the Birch Tree Bark is Scarred—Why the Raccoon has Rings on His Tail.

            CHAPTER II.

 The Children's Return—Indignation of Mary, the Indian Nurse—Her Pathetic History—Her Love for the Children—The Story of Wakonda, and of the Origin of Mosquitoes.

            CHAPTER III.

 More about Mary and the Children—Minnehaha Stung by the Bees—How the Bees Got Their Stings—What Happened to the Bears that Tried to Steal the Honey.

            CHAPTER IV.

 The Love Story of Wakontas—His Test of the Two Maidens—His Choice—The Transformation of Misticoosis.

            CHAPTER V.

 The Startling Placard—What Happened to the Little Runaways—The Rescue—Mary Tells Them the Legend of the Swallows—How Some Cruel Men were Punished who Teased an Orphan Boy.

            CHAPTER VI.

 Souwanas Tells of the Origin and Queer Doings of Nanahboozhoo—How He Lost His Brother Nahpootee, the Wolf—Why the Kingfisher Wears a White Collar.

            CHAPTER VII.

 The Legend of the Bad Boy—How He was Carried Away by Annungitee, and How He was Rescued by His Mother.

            CHAPTER VIII.

 Happy Christmas Holidays—Indians Made Glad with Presents—Souwanas Tells How Nanahboozhoo Stole the Fire from the Old Magician and Gave It to the Indians.

            CHAPTER IX.

 Kinnesasis—How the Coyote Obtained the Fire from the Interior of the Earth.

            CHAPTER X.

 The Christmas Packet—The Distribution of Gifts—A Visit by Dog Train, at Fifty-five Below Zero—Souwanas Tells How the Indians First Learned to Make Maple Sugar.

            CHAPTER XI.

 Mary Relates the Legend of the Origin of Disease—The Queer Councils Held by the Animals Against Their Common Enemy, Man.

            CHAPTER XII.

 The Naming of the Baby—A Canoe Trip—The Legend of the Discovery of Medicine—How the Chipmunk Carried the Good News.

            CHAPTER XIII.

 In the Wigwam of Souwanas—How Gray Wolf Persecuted Waubenoo, and How He was Punished by Nanahboozhoo.

            CHAPTER XIV.

 The Pathetic Love Story of Waubenoo—The Treachery of Gray Wolf—The Legend of the Whisky Jack.

            CHAPTER XV.

 A Novel Race: the Wolverine and the Rock—How the Wolverine's Legs were Shortened—A Punishment for Conceit.

            CHAPTER XVI.

 The Legend of the Twin Children of the Sun—How They Rid the Earth of Some of the Great Monsters—Their Great Battle with Nikoochis, the Giant.

            CHAPTER XVII.

 Souwanas Tells of the Queer Way in which Nanahboozhoo Destroyed Mooshekinnebik, the Last of the Great Monsters.

            CHAPTER XVIII.

 Welcome Springtime in the Northland—How Nanahboozhoo Killed the Great White Sea Lion, the Chief of the Magicians—The Revenge—The Flood—Escape of Nanahboozhoo and the Animals on the Raft—The Creation of a New World.

            CHAPTER XIX.

 Among the Briers and Wild Roses—Why the Roses have Thorns—Why the Wild Rabbits are White in Winter.

            CHAPTER XX.

 Passing Hunters and Their Spoils—The Vain Woman—Why the Marten has a White Spot on His Breast.

            CHAPTER XXI.

 Shooting Loons—Why the Loon has a Flat Back, Red Eyes, and Such Queer Feet—Nanahboozhoo Loses His Dinner—Origin of Lichens—Why Some Willows are Red—The Partridge.

            CHAPTER XXII.

 Nanahboozhoo's Ride on the Back of the Buzzard, who Lets Him Fall—A Short-lived Triumph—Why the Buzzard has No Feathers on His Head or Neck.

            CHAPTER XXIII.

 A Moonlight Trip on the Lake—The Legend of the Orphan Boy—His Appeal to the Man in the Moon—How He Conquered His Enemies.

            CHAPTER XXIV.

 Souwanas's Love for Souwanaquenapeke—How Nanahboozhoo Cured a Little Girl Bitten by a Snake—How the Rattlesnake got Its Rattle—The Origin of Tobacco—Nanahboozhoo in Trouble.

            CHAPTER XXV.

 The Dead Moose—The Rivalry Between the Elk and the Moose People, and Their Various Contests—The Disaster that Befell the Latter Tribe—The Haze of the Indian Summer.

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